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How Oil Pulling With Coconut Oil Changed My Life

When I first told my friends I had been oil pulling, they looked at me as if I were crazy. “What’s oil pulling?” they’d say. “Is this another silly alternative health quackery thing?” You sort of have to expect that when you tell people you swish coconut oil in your mouth for 20 minutes a day.

But as time has went on, some friends (mostly with desperate dental issues) have tried it and now praise it. One of my friends had a case of bad receding gums, his Dentist told him that in 6 months, he needed a follow-up and likely he’d need further processing to resolve the matter. My friend instead asked me how to oil pull. He told me he’d try it and that the truth would reside in what the Dentist, who would not be told of the pulling, would have to say. Six months later, the Dentist told him his gums were all better. And my friend has pulled ever since.

So before I get to how oil pulling helped me, some of you might be wondering what the heck oil pulling is? That’s fair enough, folks.

Oil pulling means you swish oil in your mouth for 20 minutes a day (typically first thing in the morning and typically people use cold pressed coconut oil). I put a teaspoon of coconut oil into my mouth. I swish it around the mouth and “pull” it by sucking it between teeth. I spit it out after 20 minutes (in the garbage, coconut oil can clog your drain). I then rinse my mouth with warm water. And then, well, I brush my teeth and the day begins. The purest will say it MUST be done in the morning, but I’ve never found that to be true. I do it at night sometimes as well and get wonderful results.

So what has doing this amounted to in terms of life improvements for me? Here’s a short, prioritized list.

I began to sleep better.

This was the most immediate effect. The day I started oil pulling, I noticed that I fell into a deep sleep at night. It took a week or so before I related my new found nightly deep slumbers to be related to oil pulling. I’m not here to tell you this will work for you, but I am here to say that it worked for me and it has worked this way for many others. I actually found myself having issues getting up in the morning I was sleeping so deeply, but once I was up, I was good to go: I was revived feeling. As someone commonly prone to restless nights, this unexpected benefit turned into my number one reason for oil pulling.

Plaque fell off my teeth.

I mean this in the literal sense of the description. After about 4 days, I began to notice when I’d spit the oil out that fragments were coming out as well. At first I didn’t realize what they were, but then it became clear. So I ended up getting a dental pick and prodding around, I found that plaque was falling off with relative ease. The oil pulling softens it up and it just unattached from the teeth. Having this happen caused my mouth (and piece of mind) to feel a whole lot better.

My bleeding gums stopped bleeding.

This was becoming a big issue for me. I went to the Dentist a lot over the matter. My gums hurt. Whenever I brushed my teeth, they bled (and hurt). It was tough to even floss due to the pain. I began brushing probably more than I should have. When I started oil pulling, I noticed that some parts of my mouth would bleed almost randomly, without instigation, during the middle of the day or night. At first I was concerned, but others called this a “side effect,” so I kept at it. After about two weeks, I not longer had bleeding gums or pain in my gums.

I felt more energized.

Maybe it was the better sleep, not sure, but I felt a lot more energized after oil pulling. Some say it helps balance blood sugar, which would definitely explain the effect, but I really can’t prove that as the reasoning. All I can say is that the effect was noticeable and defined.

My mouth felt way cleaner.

Brushing never caused my mouth to feel this good. Oil pulling feels like the high-powered car wash spraying every crevice while brushing feels like the bucket of soap and water with a hand-towel. Oil pulling gives your mouth this crazy ultra-clean feeling. I still brush, but I admit, if I had to choose between brushing or pulling, I’d choose pulling.

I broke out, got a flu (yeah, side effects, let’s talk about that).

The good with the bad? Yeah, things happen. I summed it up to a side effect. I got a flu about week into things and noticed acne in places I never have had acne. Could have been anything, of course, but it does seem odd that it happened right when I began oil pulling. Many claim it to be a side effect which happens in the beginning.

But side effect aside, I highly recommend everyone try oil pulling. I really consider it alternative health magic. And it doesn’t cost hardly a thing!

So which coconut oil did I use?

I use this version which is available on Amazon.

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It USED to be found at Costco, but I’m not sure why I never see it anymore. I also use Whole Foods. Here’s the tricky part, I make sure I use “Cold Pressed.” I’ve found that general grocery stores only carry expeller pressed. That means the coconut oil was exposed to heat. Whole Foods tends to have solid variety. Also, Trader Joes coconut oil is cold pressed and they only carry one brand, so you can’t go wrong. I like that one above because it’s so large. You go through it fast if you oil pull and cook with it.

Yes, you can use other oils. Traditionally, sesame oil was used. I didn’t prefer it, but I do use it in a pinch. Most of them are toasted or expeller pressed. Coconut oil seemed to have an almost magical effect.

Leave us a comment below if you oil pull, we’d love to have more stories so others can read them!

rawmeat

This Guy Eats Nothing But Raw Meat

So you are thinking about going on the Paleo Diet, are you? Well how much heart do you actually have, folks? And seriously, by “heart,” I mean how much of it do you plan to eat? Vice has recently re-interviewed a guy that only eats raw meat. He’s insane. I don’t mean that in a bad way, I’m not judging at all, but in terms of what our culture is used to, the images in the article are incredibly shocking to “digest.” His name is Derek Nance and he’s from Kentucky. He’s traveled the world consuming local raw meats. He began consuming raw meats due to a “mystery stomach illness” which seemed to be impossible to deal with until he turned to eating a raw meat diet. The interview discloses how Derek is doing now (hint, he has a girlfriend it seems!). We encourage you to check it out.


So wait, is eating raw meat good for us?

Well, lets make a pretty important immediate point: Cooked food, in any case, is processed food. Cooking is processing. And yes, I understand that there is a point of being granular which we don’t want to slide into (such as washing meat or vegetables), however, cooking probably isn’t “too far.” We don’t want to group “cooking meat” in with “Toll House Cookies,” of course, but we also don’t want to assume that cooking meat has no effect on the meat at all. More than making it “safe,” it destroys nutrients (same with vegetables). Minerals, such as vitamins A, D, E and K are stable under heat. But fat soluble vitamins, such as B-vitamins and C tend to break down and suffer substantial losses, at the very least. Vitamin C, of course, is something we could all use more of and often times, people rely on worthless vitamin C pills which aren’t really, vitamin C. But at least vitamin C can be supplied by certain vegetables and fruits. Vitamin B is found in spinach and other items that people tend to eat raw.  But if someone is eating a diet limited to mostly cooked meat (think hard core low carbers), you might be running into some deficiencies.

There is also what’s known as the oxidation of fat. When the fat of meat is exposed to oxygen, it oxidizes. This happens even if you don’t cook it, but, it happens at a much expedited rate when you do cook it. Some believe that oxidized fats are inflammatory and should be avoided. Remember, even if you eat lean meats, they still have fat in them.

In some circles, it is believed that charred meat is cancerous. 

When meat—be it beef, pork, fish, or poultry—is cooked at high temperatures, it forms heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). According to the National Cancer Institute, HCAs and PCAs cause cancer in animal models (think: lab rats). So far it’s unclear if humans sprout cancer growths after exposure to HCAs and PHAs, but we aren’t volunteering for any trials to find out for sure.

Meat has long been associated with higher cancer risk, but many sources argue that correlation is not causation when it comes to the studies. A great many other factors, of course, exist, such as hormones / antibiotics found in the meat source and what diet the animal was subjected to while living its life.

But our common sense wisdom says that we cook meat to avoid bacteria and parasites that might do us severe harm. The CDC claims that meat is responsible for 22% of food-borne illnesses. And well, 29% of the deaths. That puts them behind leafy vegetables as the second most dangerous. But this claim, while valid, is wide ranging. It doesn’t dis-include pure, grass fed, organic meats. Any raw foodie is going to tell you that’s a huge difference maker, of course. In other words, maybe raw meat isn’t dangerous, but raw meat from poor sources is.

After this, we get into pretty much the basic premise of raw food eating in general: That’s how humans evolved. For some raw food advocates, cooking is a way of processing which relieves us of vital sources of vitamins and minerals while also putting us at risk for cancer, among other things. Raw, in their eyes, is always better, even when it comes to meat. But what if cooking HELPED humans evolve, rather than served as a detriment to their evolution. That’s exactly what one study from 2009 proposes.

This means that however sophisticated the non-thermal processing methods were, cooking would have conferred incremental energetic benefits. While much remains to be discovered, we conclude that the adoption of cooking would have led to an important rise in energy availability. For this reason, we predict that cooking had substantial evolutionary significance.

This isn’t to say that what Mr. Nance is doing isn’t helping him. He had an ailment which Doctors couldn’t resolve (we all most certainly understand that). He changed his diet and resolved it himself (boy, do we ever understand that). The key question is if it had to be raw meat, or if potentially some other variable exists. We all know that changing a diet is a complex matter. You leave out one item, you feel worse or better, you decide that item was the culprit. Then later you realize you also left out another item due to the complexity that is food and diet.

Many of us eat for various reason. Some are driven by animal ethics, while others are driven by cancer prevention. Some even eat for increased concentration or to help them have a baby. The list goes on. In the end and all things being equal, a diet, no matter how grotesque or shocking it may seem, is a pretty personal experience. This includes Mr. Nance and his vampire cocktail.

milk

Pesticide Found In Milk Linked To Parkinson’s

Milk. It does the body good, right? Not always. Dairy is constantly under health scrutiny anymore and this month’s study into a pesticide found to have been used in milk decades ago is reviving that scrutiny. The pesticide, heeptachlor epoxide, was used in the 1980’s. It’s first used on pineapples. It made its way into the milk supply when cows began eating remnants of pineapples in Hawaii.

The study showed that non-smokers who drank more than two cups of milk per day were significantly more likely to develop Parkinson’s. The study originally was supposed to monitor the effects of aging, hence the average age of each participant was 54.

For the study, 449 Japanese-American men with an average age of 54 who participated in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study were followed for more than 30 years and until death, after which autopsies were performed. Tests looked at whether participants had lost brain cells in the substantia nigra area of the brain, which occurs in Parkinson’s disease and can start decades before any symptoms begin. Researchers also measured in 116 brains the amount of residue of a pesticide called heptachlor epoxide. The pesticide was found at very high levels in the milk supply in the early 1980s in Hawaii, where it was used in the pineapple industry. It was used to kill insects and was removed from use in the US around that time. The pesticide may also be found in well water.

The study found that nonsmokers who drank more than two cups of milk per day had 40 percent fewer brain cells in that area of the brain than people who drank less than two cups of milk per day. For those who were smokers at any point, there was no association between milk intake and loss of brain cells. Previous studies have shown that people who smoke have a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.

This isn’t dairy’s first run in with being linked to Parkinson’s. Here’s a study from 2007 that cited similar findings.

In this large observational study, we found that higher dairy consumption was associated with increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. The association was stronger in men and was mostly explained by milk consumption.

What’s further interesting is that the pesticide link isn’t full proof; in other words, the milk itself isn’t ruled out as the actual cause. The researchers were quick to point out that the study’s results could have been based on “chance.” And that the milk was never tested for the pesticide in question. In any case, heeptachlor epoxide isn’t used as a pesticide anymore.

Parkinson’s affects roughly 1 million people in the states and it has no cure.

 

Photo by mapper-montag

Harvard Study ‘Low Fat Milk Not Good For You’

Low fat milk was all the rage for years. To be honest, I never really bought into it because I never fully bought into the low fat movement, but you couldn’t argue with the popularity of low fat food and drink options. Low fat milk was a huge seller for those people thinking they were being health conscious. But now the rub, which is, they probably weren’t being health conscious: instead low fat milk may have been serving as a detriment to their health.

Low fat milk containers added sweeteners. Remember, without fat or sugar, things just aren’t palatable. In order for a food or drink to be palatable to most people, you need one or both of them. According to the Daily Mail, David Ludwig, who has often likened sugar to poison, low fat dairy solutions are bad for us.

In a paper published, Ludwig argued that dairy products with added sweeteners are a detriment to one’s health and that drinking less milk isn’t necessarily a bad idea, provided you eat certain foods.

‘Americans are consuming billions of gallons of milk a year, presumably under the assumption that their bones would crumble without them,’ Ludwig wrote in an article published in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics.

The U.S Government recommends we drink 3 glasses of milk a day. Does anyone know anyone who actually does this anymore? I haven’t drank a glass of milk in 30 years at least. Ludwig is especially concerned with kids who are often forced by schools to meet Government food and drink recommendations. When given low fat versions of milk, they don’t typically like them, so schools replace them with sweetened versions such as chocolate milk.

But wouldn’t our bodies and our children’s bodies fall apart without milk and all that calcium? No, not at all. Spinach and Kale are both loaded with calcium. As adults, we can simply add in more kale and spinach using salads or even juicing them. With children who might be reluctant to consume these two greens, you can always sneak them into their food sources (food processors are a wonderful thing). If kids must have milk, you are best to avoid the sweetened versions, in particular chocolate and strawberry. Try to get whole fat versions of the milk. Sugar is the main problem here. With childhood obesity at an all time high, avoiding processed sugars has never been more important.

Other non-dairy calcium sources for people include: Sardines, Soybeans, Fortified cereals and orange juice.

Photo by mapper-montag

lotion

Moisturizing Creams Could Increase Skin Cancer Risk

Body and hand lotions are some of the most used skin products on earth. Many people keep lotions at their work desk, beside their beds or in their bathrooms. The marketing pitches by these creams contend that use of the products can cause anti-aging effects as well as soften skin. But the fact is, these type of lotions really are just chemicals. Have you ever read the ingredients on a bottle? There are lots of natural solutions available in place of these.

A study has show that Dermabase, Dermovan, Eucerin Original Moisturizing Cream, or Vanicream may cause skin cancer. This also means tanning oils and lotions parents may apply to their babies. Sunlight-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is diagnosed in over 1 million people per year. Each year, the rate of diagnosis in people increases, which science has justified with an increasing aging population. Many people do survive, but squamous cell carcinomas are killers.

The sun gets blamed as the cause. But the fact is, studies haven’t been incredibly extensive past this. Meaning there is a whole list of variables that are ignored when we merely say “the sun causes skin cancer.” One of those other variables is the application of topical creams. It could stand to reason that the increase in skin cancer is directly affiliated to the increase in the use of topical creams. Once a study took a closer look at this, the results, well, weren’t too incredibly surprising.

During studies to determine the safety of four commercially available and widely used moisturizing creams as possible vehicles for topical chemoprevention studies, we found that they all had tumorigenic activity when applied topically to UVB-pretreated high-risk mice.

Of course, the study only used mice, but it is all we have to go on since no other types of testing are done. This study was not funded, of course, by any of the large corporate producers of topical lotion, rendering it unbiased. In addition, the study points out a greater need for more studies, but it also highlights that these topical creams are never tested for carcinogenic activity. In other words, “safety tests” do not apply to skin cancer issues. This is hugely important to anyone considering using these product.

We are a wellness site. So of course, we say slather on some coconut oil and avoid the risk. Skin cancer is rising yearly and it seems to reason that these creams are playing some kind of a role.

Photo by David Guo’s Master

pixabay salmon sushi

The FDA Just Approving GMO Salmon

Yep, this is actually happening. GMO Salmon is now approved by the FDA. So go ahead folks, eat your science lab fishy with that peaceful safe and secure feeling you eat regular fish that was made by nature with. Because that just makes all the sense in the world.

The FDA Approves AquAdvantage Salmon.

The FDA has approved AquaBounty Technologies’ application for AquAdvantage Salmon, an Atlantic salmon that reaches market size more quickly than non-GE farm-raised Atlantic salmon. The FDA regulates GE animals under the new animal drug provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, because the recombinant DNA (rDNA) construct introduced into the animal meets the definition of a drug. In this case, the rDNA construct introduces a trait that makes the AquAdvantage Salmon grow faster.

“The FDA has thoroughly analyzed and evaluated the data and information submitted by AquaBounty Technologies regarding AquAdvantage Salmon and determined that they have met the regulatory requirements for approval, including that food from the fish is safe to eat,” said Bernadette Dunham, D.V.M., Ph.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine.

The CEO of AquaBounty, Ronald L. Stotish, says it’s a “game changer.”

So what does this mean? It means corporations and labs are inventing your food, both vegetables and actual paraphyletic species. Of course, you can’t avoid eating it by reading the label, but you can avoid farmed salmon to avoid ingesting it. So buying wild salmon means you aren’t. Or buy farmed “game changer laboratory invented” salmon. Your choice. I think we all know the choice we plan to make.

The FDA is clearly got it’s hand in someone’s pocket, which is disturbing at the highest of levels. This is our food supply. I can’t see how they can pitch the “GMOs save the world” with this one, as I doubt highly they are producing this same for philanthropic purposes in Africa.

 

image credit: pixabay

image credit: pixabay

Should You Stop Refrigerating Your Eggs?

Eggs. They are amazing for you. A true health bomb. I eat eggs every darn day (seriously, I never miss a day). I eat them boiled. I scramble. I sunny side up. I eat them in corn shell tacos. I eat them with mushrooms. I cook them in coconut oil. And in every situation, they are EggTastic.

But on the daily, my Internet experience comes with a host of crazy Internet headlines. Some tell me I’m too skinny or too fat. Some tell me I’m watching too much TV. Others tell me that the world is ending next year. And then one headline, well it tells me that I’m a darn fool for refrigerating my eggs.

What’s that you say you evil Internet headline?

Of course I have to refrigerate my eggs, I’d die if I didn’t (from something, I think). Refrigerators also come with an egg rack, if eggs didn’t go in there, then why the heck would I have an egg rack in my refrigerator? You see, common sense at play is a beautiful thing. But of course, my anecdotal assumptions aren’t incredibly scientific.

I’ve read some of the articles telling me I can leave my eggs out on my dresser drawer for days without incurring any devastating effects. I’ve googled. I’ve asked friends. I’ve called random people in Amsterdam to make sure they are actually alive and then asked if they’ve eaten eggs recently. I’ve even asked the eggs themselves. Here is my take on the egg situation.

Eggs come out of a chicken (we knew this). When eggs come out of the chicken, they possess a layer of protection. It is a barely visible layer of protection. The kicker comes now…..The United States, Australia and Scandinavia wash this layer off in a shower with soap. BOOM! The layer is gone. This compromises the egg’s natural ability to protect itself from bacteria, namely Salmonella. The layer also makes sure water and oxygen don’t get in. Once this layer is gone, the egg can no longer protect itself and refrigeration is essential to preserving their protection.

But wait, why do Americans do that?

Well, there is a funny hook here. Americans, Japanese and Australians just think chickens are super dirty species. I mean, that’s the start at least.

Here is a great excerpt from NPR.com over the matter.

Salmonella enteritidiscan infect a chicken’s ovaries, contaminating a yolk before the shell firms up around it. Cooking usually kills the bacteria before they can harm you; still, eggs contaminated with salmonella are responsible for about 142,000 illnesses a year in the U.S., according to the Food and Drug Administration.

In some European countries, egg-laying hens are vaccinated against salmonella. In the U.S., vaccination is not required, but eggs must be washed and refrigerated from farm to store, and producers must follow a host of other safety measures.

“They’re different approaches to basically achieve the same result,” says Vincent Guyonnet, a poultry veterinarian and scientific adviser to the International Egg Commission. “We don’t have massive [food safety] issues on either side of the Atlantic. Both methods seem to work.”

So now the million dollar question, do we really have to refrigerate them? In a way, it seems like we kind of don’t. But, we’d risk oxygen and water “spoiling” the eggs. The bacteria is cooked away, unless you plan to eat them raw. And if you are Rocky, this could be the case. I am guessing however, that you are not Rocky.

image credit: pixabay

flickr vegetable oil crisco

Scientist Warn Vegetable Oils Now Linked To Cancer & Dementia

Coconut Oil, Butter, even Lard now being recommended in place of it.

According to The Telegraph.

Scientists found that heating up vegetable oils leads to the release of high concentrations of chemicals called aldehydes, which have been linked to cancer, heart disease and dementia.

Heated coconut oil, lard, butter and olive oil produce a substantial amount less of aldehydes, which seem to be the core issue. Many people have a long held belief, based on recommendations by Health agencies, that corn oil and sunflower oil are better than the saturated fats found in animal products. According to this new study however, that may not be true at all.

When vegetable oils are heated up, according to scientist, they release a high concentration of chemicals known as aldehydes. Aldehydes have been linked to cancer, heart disease and dementia.

Martin Grootveld, a professor of bioanalytical chemistry and chemical pathology, said that his research showed “a typical meal of fish and chips”, fried in vegetable oil, contained as much as 100 to 200 times more toxic aldehydes than the safe daily limit set by the World Health Organisation.

You can read the full story (here).

We have long recommended that everyone switch their cooking oil over to coconut oil and / or olive oil. Only use olive oil for lower heat cooking, and substitute the coconut oil for higher eat cooking. It is best to avoid vegetable oils, now more-so than ever.

Photo by JeepersMedia

fotolia bone broth

Why Bone Broth Is An Amazing Daily Health Bomb

When I think of bone broth, I think of grandma’s house when I was a child. A sort of peppery, onion smell filling the room. A hot stove, a simmering pot. Bone broth is making a comeback, so much so, that places in NYC are now starting to serve it up, like Starbucks serves coffee. Bone broth is going mainstream you say? Say it isn’t so. Well, it is very so. And hey, that’s a good thing. We live in a society that gulps down too much coffee and soda, why not introduce people to bone broth? It just makes sense.

I am going to break down some benefits of Bone Broth, as well as give my laymen’s spin over the matter because quite honestly, it can be a bit confusing. Let’s start with the benefits.

Great for your gut

Digestion and gut health is huge business for your body. It might even be number 1, but rarely is it considered that high in the equation. Gut health means brain health. Things like anxiety and depression can start in the gut. I highly suggest you understand this concept. Below is a quote from an article you might consider reading later.

If you’ve ever “gone with your gut” to make a decision or felt “butterflies in your stomach” when nervous, you’re likely getting signals from an unexpected source: your second brain.  Hidden in the walls of the digestive system, this “brain in your gut” is revolutionizing medicine’s understanding of the links between digestion, mood, health and even the way you think.  (article is here)

The gelatin found in bone broth is great for healing the intestines, which helps with leaky gut syndrome. Whether you have leaky gut syndrome or not, you want to keep your gut and intestines primed.

Hair, Nails, Skin (you will look fabulous)

We spend all this time on our hair and skin (and ladies, on your nails), then why not add bone broth into your diet and get the full on hair/ nails / skin health bomb? Bone broth has collagen in it. Yep, you’ve seen that as a supplement in the vitamin section. Well, it’s naturally found inside of bone broth. So when you drink bone broth, you get an infusion of health into your hair and nails and skin. You get it direct from source. My nails grow really fast now that I drink bone broth. That’s a great indicator of healthy being!

Sleep sounder

Some researchers believe that consuming gelatin, which is found in bone broth, before sleep helps you sleep deeper and more soundly. Gelatin contains the amino acid glycine. That’s hooked to your brain’s neurotransmitters. Nope, it won’t put you to sleep if you drink it on the way out the door, quite the opposite. But at night, it will help relax you.

Helps heal bones

Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus. Those are found in large quantities in bone broth. Those minerals help your body heal injured bones. As well, helps your joints.

Mineral overload

Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and other trace minerals are all found in bone broth. They are naturally occurring, straight from the source.

Now, let’s get into the details of actually making and drinking this stuff.

How does it taste? Great. If  you make it right, it tastes really good. I absolutely love drinking it in the morning time. It taste a lot like chicken soup or onion soup (pending you use the onions).

Can’t I just buy it at the store? No. You can’t. You will see “bone broth” for sale, lots of people use that to cook food in crock pots. But that stuff does not contain the collagen, which you need. To get what you need, you just have to make it.

How do I buy the bones? This can be tricky. There are online sources for this, but many of those sources run out of the bones due to lots of people wanting to buy them. If you have a local butcher, I’d visit them and ask. Grocery stores are a maybe. Whole Foods tends to get them in once a week, but you will have to ask them what day and if you can call and have some put aside. But buyer beware…. Lots of meat in this country is just plain bad. If a cow or chicken was injected with hormones and antibiotics, you probably don’t want the bones which stored the life of the animal. Basic grocery stores are probably bad when it comes to broth bones. If you want to potentially look online to order, start here. They look pretty good, though I admit to never having ordered from them.

Should it be chicken or beef bones or both? You can mix. Or you can do specific ones. I don’t think it really matters. But, you want specific types of bones. Knuckles, neck bones, bones that have the collagen fillers in them. Ask for “soup bones” for broth at the butcher, or of course, use a trusted online source.

How do you cook it? I use a crock pot, but you can use a p0t on the stove. I roast the bones first for about 40 minutes. I then put the bones in the crock pot. I also put an onion chopped 3 ways, a few carrots, pink himalayan salt, a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar (most important, see below) and a tomato. I don’t want to get overly detailed here, to be honest, because I am a known simpleton. Anything I make will be simple and that might not be your “cup of broth.” The Internet is filled with some amazing recipes on how to make it, I’d encourage you searching around. Wellness Mama has a good instructional on it that I encourage you check out.

I can’t get it to “gel.” Ok, this is the number one complaint. For starters, make darn sure you put the apple cider vinegar in it as mentioned above. This will help draw out and extract the gelatin. Other considerations are cooking time (did you cook it long enough). I cook for around 40 hours in the crock pot. How was your bone to water ratio? Here is a good troubleshooting article on food renegade. But don’t panic….when I first started making my own bone broth, gelling was hit or miss for me. And I would always think, “so is it worthless now?” No, not at all. It is still GREAT for you. Many people put on sad failure faces as if what they made is worthless without gelling, this isn’t true at all.

Did this help? Leave us a comment. Remember, people read comments as a way to extend on the article. I’m no big meanie, if you have criticisms, throw them down below. If you have suggestions or recipes, post them in comments. This website is just about helping others and part of that is participation.

Fotolia Image Author: photosiber