Healthy Protein

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Should You Stop Refrigerating Your Eggs?

Eggs. They are amazing for you. A true health bomb. I eat eggs every darn day (seriously, I never miss a day). I eat them boiled. I scramble. I sunny side up. I eat them in corn shell tacos. I eat them with mushrooms. I cook them in coconut oil. And in every situation, they are EggTastic.

But on the daily, my Internet experience comes with a host of crazy Internet headlines. Some tell me I’m too skinny or too fat. Some tell me I’m watching too much TV. Others tell me that the world is ending next year. And then one headline, well it tells me that I’m a darn fool for refrigerating my eggs.

What’s that you say you evil Internet headline?

Of course I have to refrigerate my eggs, I’d die if I didn’t (from something, I think). Refrigerators also come with an egg rack, if eggs didn’t go in there, then why the heck would I have an egg rack in my refrigerator? You see, common sense at play is a beautiful thing. But of course, my anecdotal assumptions aren’t incredibly scientific.

I’ve read some of the articles telling me I can leave my eggs out on my dresser drawer for days without incurring any devastating effects. I’ve googled. I’ve asked friends. I’ve called random people in Amsterdam to make sure they are actually alive and then asked if they’ve eaten eggs recently. I’ve even asked the eggs themselves. Here is my take on the egg situation.

Eggs come out of a chicken (we knew this). When eggs come out of the chicken, they possess a layer of protection. It is a barely visible layer of protection. The kicker comes now…..The United States, Australia and Scandinavia wash this layer off in a shower with soap. BOOM! The layer is gone. This compromises the egg’s natural ability to protect itself from bacteria, namely Salmonella. The layer also makes sure water and oxygen don’t get in. Once this layer is gone, the egg can no longer protect itself and refrigeration is essential to preserving their protection.

But wait, why do Americans do that?

Well, there is a funny hook here. Americans, Japanese and Australians just think chickens are super dirty species. I mean, that’s the start at least.

Here is a great excerpt from NPR.com over the matter.

Salmonella enteritidiscan infect a chicken’s ovaries, contaminating a yolk before the shell firms up around it. Cooking usually kills the bacteria before they can harm you; still, eggs contaminated with salmonella are responsible for about 142,000 illnesses a year in the U.S., according to the Food and Drug Administration.

In some European countries, egg-laying hens are vaccinated against salmonella. In the U.S., vaccination is not required, but eggs must be washed and refrigerated from farm to store, and producers must follow a host of other safety measures.

“They’re different approaches to basically achieve the same result,” says Vincent Guyonnet, a poultry veterinarian and scientific adviser to the International Egg Commission. “We don’t have massive [food safety] issues on either side of the Atlantic. Both methods seem to work.”

So now the million dollar question, do we really have to refrigerate them? In a way, it seems like we kind of don’t. But, we’d risk oxygen and water “spoiling” the eggs. The bacteria is cooked away, unless you plan to eat them raw. And if you are Rocky, this could be the case. I am guessing however, that you are not Rocky.

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Walnuts Are A Natural, More Powerful Statin. Big Pharma Would Rather You NOT Know This.

I love walnuts. Maybe you love walnuts also. But once you realize how great they are for you, you will love them now more than ever. A new study is showing that walnuts naturally lower cholersterol. In a randomized controlled study by David L. Katz, 112 people were assigned a diet with or without counseling regarding adjustments in their caloric intake. Some were added walnuts while some were not. The study was conducted for 6 months. Check out the results.

When compared with a walnut-excluded diet, a walnut-included diet for 6?months, with or without dietary counseling to adjust caloric intake, significantly improved diet quality as measured by the Healthy Eating Index 2010 (9.14±17.71 vs 0.40±15.13; p=0.02 and 7.02±15.89 vs -5.92±21.84; p=0.001, respectively). Endothelial function, total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol improved significantly from baseline in the walnut-included diet.

With all the hype about statins, which are some of the most prescribed drugs in the world, wouldn’t it be easier to just include walnuts in your diet? Walnuts are easy to include in a daily diet. You can eat them straight up (that’s how I do it), or you can add them into salads, oatmeal or a variety of other foods. Walnuts are high in good fats, high in potassium, high in fiber and are a good source for Vitamin B6, Magnesium and Iron. Daily ingestion of Walnuts is a no brainer.

Remember, statins inhibit enzyme HMG-C0A as a way to prevent cholesterol. Walnuts naturally just keep your cholesterol healthy (cholersterol isn’t really completely bad for you, your body needs it). Natural solutions mean less risk, less cost and more time spent without side effects.

What else can Walnuts do for you?

They can help you manage your weight.

Walnuts are high in fiber, so they satiate you. In other words, they cause you to feel full, which means lower caloric intake. Which means managing or losing weight, depending on your current weight. A good way to use Walnuts is to keep them on your desk at work, or beside your bed, for whenever you feel bad sugar cravings hit. By the time you eat a handful of them, the cravings for bad foods are gone.

They contain powerful antioxidants

Antioxidants fight free radicals, which contribute to things like aging and cancer. Walnuts contain some rare and powerful antioxidants, including tannin telimagrandin, flavonol morin and juglone. Yeah, not fancy names, but they work hard to help you stay looking younger.

They may make you smarter

Seriously, Walnuts are brain food. They contain vitamin E, melatonin, omega 3 and folate. That’s steroids for your brain.

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The Amazing Benefits Of One Egg a Day

I wish we all had know this earlier, right? This is amazing. Eggs are life changers.

Eggs. Remember when eggs were given a villainous rap? They caused heart disease. Their cholesterol was bad stuff. If you started your day off with eggs, you were slowly killing yourself.

It was all a non-sensical diatribe based on incredibly faulty science. The cholesterol in eggs was supposed to be killing us, but instead, it was saving us the entire time. In fact, the cholesterol in eggs seems to help prevent heart disease and breast cancer. Who feels like they were taken for a ride now?

Via Ngrguardiannews.com: The stakeholders which include: farmers, students, markets and egg merchants expressed the believe that that an egg has many nutritional benefits like protein, vitamins, and cholesterol, which can reduce the risks of heart diseases.

And

Via foodforbreastcancer.com: Egg yolks are a significant source of choline, consumption of which has been found to be associated with lower risk of breast cancer in some studies. A case-control study of the participants in the Nurses’ Health Study found that consumption of eggs during high school was positively associated with lower risk of breast cancer for the women in adulthood. A major study combining the data in eight previous prospective North American and European studies found breast cancer risk was slightly decreased for women who consumed fewer than two eggs per week but slightly increased among women who consumed one or more eggs per day compared to women who did not eat eggs.

What are the other benefits?

  1. Eggs are a good source for choline (mentioned above), vitamin A, vitamin D, iron, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), lutein, zeaxanthin. That’s a super health bomb of nutrients right there!
  2. Buy the Omega 3 enriched eggs, or pastured eggs, and you get Omega 3 fatty acid. Most people in the US are heavy on Omega 6, which can cause inflammation. Omega 3 balances things out. Think fish. Yep, you can eat these eggs for the same effect.
  3. Eggs raise your good cholesterol: HDL. “HDL-C is the “good” cholesterol because it exerts multiple beneficial functions within the cardiovascular system. Higher levels are more beneficial, and your physician should not undertake any therapeutic measures to reduce your HDL-C. “(source)
  4. Eggs contain Lutein (mentioned above) and Zeaxanthin. These help your eyesight stay strong. “Lutein, zeaxanthin, 3′-epilutein, and 3-hydroxy-beta,epsilon-caroten-3′-one in human retina may be interconverted through a series of oxidation-reduction reactions similar to our earlier proposed metabolic transformation of these compounds in humans. The presence of the direct oxidation product of lutein and 3′-epilutein (metabolite of lutein and zeaxanthin) in human retina suggests that lutein and zeaxanthin may act as antioxidants to protect the macula against short-wavelength visible light.” (source)
  5. They are easy and simple to prepare and affordable. You get all the protein you need from eggs. You can boil them, scramble them, fry them in coconut oil. You can buy easy to use egg boiler contraptions that work while you are getting dressed.

Eggs are a health bomb. They are easy to prepare. No reason to not eat at least one egg a day.

fotolia bone broth Fotolia Author: photosiber

Why Bone Broth Is An Amazing Daily Health Bomb

When I think of bone broth, I think of grandma’s house when I was a child. A sort of peppery, onion smell filling the room. A hot stove, a simmering pot. Bone broth is making a comeback, so much so, that places in NYC are now starting to serve it up, like Starbucks serves coffee. Bone broth is going mainstream you say? Say it isn’t so. Well, it is very so. And hey, that’s a good thing. We live in a society that gulps down too much coffee and soda, why not introduce people to bone broth? It just makes sense.

I am going to break down some benefits of Bone Broth, as well as give my laymen’s spin over the matter because quite honestly, it can be a bit confusing. Let’s start with the benefits.

Great for your gut

Digestion and gut health is huge business for your body. It might even be number 1, but rarely is it considered that high in the equation. Gut health means brain health. Things like anxiety and depression can start in the gut. I highly suggest you understand this concept. Below is a quote from an article you might consider reading later.

If you’ve ever “gone with your gut” to make a decision or felt “butterflies in your stomach” when nervous, you’re likely getting signals from an unexpected source: your second brain.  Hidden in the walls of the digestive system, this “brain in your gut” is revolutionizing medicine’s understanding of the links between digestion, mood, health and even the way you think.  (article is here)

The gelatin found in bone broth is great for healing the intestines, which helps with leaky gut syndrome. Whether you have leaky gut syndrome or not, you want to keep your gut and intestines primed.

Hair, Nails, Skin (you will look fabulous)

We spend all this time on our hair and skin (and ladies, on your nails), then why not add bone broth into your diet and get the full on hair/ nails / skin health bomb? Bone broth has collagen in it. Yep, you’ve seen that as a supplement in the vitamin section. Well, it’s naturally found inside of bone broth. So when you drink bone broth, you get an infusion of health into your hair and nails and skin. You get it direct from source. My nails grow really fast now that I drink bone broth. That’s a great indicator of healthy being!

Sleep sounder

Some researchers believe that consuming gelatin, which is found in bone broth, before sleep helps you sleep deeper and more soundly. Gelatin contains the amino acid glycine. That’s hooked to your brain’s neurotransmitters. Nope, it won’t put you to sleep if you drink it on the way out the door, quite the opposite. But at night, it will help relax you.

Helps heal bones

Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus. Those are found in large quantities in bone broth. Those minerals help your body heal injured bones. As well, helps your joints.

Mineral overload

Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and other trace minerals are all found in bone broth. They are naturally occurring, straight from the source.

Now, let’s get into the details of actually making and drinking this stuff.

How does it taste? Great. If  you make it right, it tastes really good. I absolutely love drinking it in the morning time. It taste a lot like chicken soup or onion soup (pending you use the onions).

Can’t I just buy it at the store? No. You can’t. You will see “bone broth” for sale, lots of people use that to cook food in crock pots. But that stuff does not contain the collagen, which you need. To get what you need, you just have to make it.

How do I buy the bones? This can be tricky. There are online sources for this, but many of those sources run out of the bones due to lots of people wanting to buy them. If you have a local butcher, I’d visit them and ask. Grocery stores are a maybe. Whole Foods tends to get them in once a week, but you will have to ask them what day and if you can call and have some put aside. But buyer beware…. Lots of meat in this country is just plain bad. If a cow or chicken was injected with hormones and antibiotics, you probably don’t want the bones which stored the life of the animal. Basic grocery stores are probably bad when it comes to broth bones. If you want to potentially look online to order, start here. They look pretty good, though I admit to never having ordered from them.

Should it be chicken or beef bones or both? You can mix. Or you can do specific ones. I don’t think it really matters. But, you want specific types of bones. Knuckles, neck bones, bones that have the collagen fillers in them. Ask for “soup bones” for broth at the butcher, or of course, use a trusted online source.

How do you cook it? I use a crock pot, but you can use a p0t on the stove. I roast the bones first for about 40 minutes. I then put the bones in the crock pot. I also put an onion chopped 3 ways, a few carrots, pink himalayan salt, a teaspoon of apple cider vinegar (most important, see below) and a tomato. I don’t want to get overly detailed here, to be honest, because I am a known simpleton. Anything I make will be simple and that might not be your “cup of broth.” The Internet is filled with some amazing recipes on how to make it, I’d encourage you searching around. Wellness Mama has a good instructional on it that I encourage you check out.

I can’t get it to “gel.” Ok, this is the number one complaint. For starters, make darn sure you put the apple cider vinegar in it as mentioned above. This will help draw out and extract the gelatin. Other considerations are cooking time (did you cook it long enough). I cook for around 40 hours in the crock pot. How was your bone to water ratio? Here is a good troubleshooting article on food renegade. But don’t panic….when I first started making my own bone broth, gelling was hit or miss for me. And I would always think, “so is it worthless now?” No, not at all. It is still GREAT for you. Many people put on sad failure faces as if what they made is worthless without gelling, this isn’t true at all.

Did this help? Leave us a comment. Remember, people read comments as a way to extend on the article. I’m no big meanie, if you have criticisms, throw them down below. If you have suggestions or recipes, post them in comments. This website is just about helping others and part of that is participation.

Fotolia Image Author: photosiber